Developer Showcase: Adela Ramirez Chirinos, IoT.bzh

adela ramirez chirinos iot.bzh

Adela Ramirez Chirinos
Web Developer
IoT.bzh

Tell us a bit about yourself – how did you get your start in automotive technology?

To say the least, it hasn’t been easy. I was born in Peru, where I studied economics and law.

One day, I had the opportunity to continue and finish my university studies in France, where, after a some work experience in tourism, I felt convinced to go back to school and fulfill my passion: computer science.

When I finished university, IoT.bzh showed their confidence and trust in me by recruiting me as a junior developer, and I was quickly able to contribute to the AGL project.

Today, I am very invested in what I do, and I am always open to learning new things.

What do you work on currently?

Today I am working on the IoT.bzh redpesk project. I am specialized primarily on the front-end side of the web tool of continuous integration for redpesk.

The challenge here is to work on the design and workflow of the web tool and try to keep it simple to perform complex tasks like cross compilation of packages, tests on different targets, etc.

What are you working on within AGL? Can you sum up your experience so far?

I am currently focused on the redpesk LTS version of AGL, which will guarantee a functional maintenance and maximum cyber security during the whole lifetime of a
vehicle (10 years).

In general, I am very happy to work on the AGL project because, by working with so many experienced engineers, I am gaining a lot of experience and I hope I will be able to make many contributions to AGL in the future.

What do you like about open source software? What do you dislike?

I like the liberty and freedom of doing what you want to do freely and without being beholden to traditional organizations.

I like the countless projects you can access and contribute to and the opportunity of international collaboration. It’s difficult to find disadvantages in open source software, because open source is the way to go.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing open source software and developers across the automotive industry?

Trying to compete with non open source projects and convincing them that open collaboration is the future.

How do you think AGL can help solve that challenge?

By demonstrating to the automotive industry that AGL is better than other solutions available in the automotive market.

What do you think is most important for AGL to focus on in the next year?

From my point of view, AGL should demonstrate that its technology is mature and stable enough to target mass automotive production. To broaden the developer community, I think that AGL should expand into other industry sectors.

What are the most interesting AGL technologies, apps, or use cases from your perspective?

From my perspective, that would be the security on the AGL base system.

What is the best piece of career advice you’ve ever received?

In fact, there are two. First: “Live your passion!” as my best career choice was to retrain in computer science studies.

And the second: “there is no dumb question!” When learning new things, all questions are important in order to improve yourself and help other people around you. Ask all the questions you can because otherwise you won’t learn.

What advice would you offer other developers or software engineers interested in getting started with AGL?

Go ahead, and get involved! Don’t be afraid to make the first step and get in contact with people who work on the project.

What is your favorite car?

Definitely concepts like the model from TOYOTA Concept-i, pretty futuristic.

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In the AGL Developer Showcase series, we talk to developers and software engineers to learn more about the work they are doing with AGL and open source. If you are currently involved in AGL or a user of AGL and would like to be featured in the Developer Showcase, please email us